Dalhousie food study

A new study conducted by Dalhousie University has found that more than six million Canadians are restricting their meat consumption.

Dalhousie has shared preliminary results of the study, which is titled “Plant-based dieting and meat attachment: Protein wars and the changing Canadian consumer.” Based on results of an online survey in September, the study examined Canadian attitudes toward plant-based protein alternatives.

The study found that 6.4 million Canadians are following a diet that restricts meat partially or completely. Just under half of respondents eat meat daily, with an additional 40 per cent saying they eat meat once or twice a week.

Just over half of respondents are willing to reduce meat consumption, and one-third are willing to do in the next six months. Regionally, Ontarians are most likely to already be eating less meat, and those in Atlantic Canada are the least likely.

Other findings:

  • women are more motivated by animal welfare, and more likely to believe meat can be replaced by other protein sources;
  • more men – especially older men – consider meat eating “one of life’s great pleasures”;
  • younger, more educated respondents were less likely to favour meat and more likely to want plant-based alternatives;
  • lab grown meat and insect based proteins are still not appealing to Canadian consumers, though younger respondents are more receptive to lab grown meat.

See more on the study here.

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